‘The Brief: Gemini’

The latest installment of Clarke & Esposito’s The Brief newsletter is, as always, sharp and informative. The lead bit is on Google’s new Gemini, and its example AI academic search. Thanks to Google Scholar, Gemini can mine OA content at the article level, even in...

‘The Politics of Rights Retention’

Sam Moore, concluding a thoughtful analysis of rights-retention policies in Europe an elsewhere: To be clear, very little of the negotiations around rights retention represents much more than liberal market economics—it should not be confused for the kind of political...

CCC’s Shot Across the Bow

Roy Kaufman, CEO of the for-profit Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), posted excerpts from the company’s response to the US Copyright Office’s call for comments on AI training data. The Scholarly Kitchen post is fascinating and worthy of notice. It’s hardly surprising...

‘The Oligopoly’s Shift to Open Access’

Speaking of APC revenue, Leigh-Ann Butler and colleagues have a great paper out in Quantitative Science Studies, on APC revenue from the big five commercial publishers (2015–2018): Revenue from gold OA amounted to $612.5 million, while $448.3 million was obtained for...

OSTP Remains APC-friendly

The just-released U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) report on OA financing is definitely interesting—it’s far more in-depth in its scope than the last year’s Nelson Memo. References to cOAlition S, diamond OA, subscribe-to-open, and other...

‘LexisNexis Sold Face Recognition, Spy Tools to CBP’

A coda to Tuesday’s post on SPARC’s Elsevier report. Here’s Sam Biddle, writing for The Intercept on Elsevier corporate sibling LexisNexis Risk Solutions: The popular data broker LexisNexis began selling face recognition services and personal location data to U.S....

The ScienceDirect Data Hoover

From SPARC North America’s overview of its important new report on Elsevier’s ScienceDirect data tracking: By analyzing the privacy practices of the world’s largest publisher, the report describes how user tracking that would be unthinkable in a physical library...

The Redemption of Plan S

On Tuesday—Halloween here in the US—cOAlition S released a new open access blueprint, one that, in effect, proposes to dismantle the prevailing journal system. Under an anodyne title (“Toward Responsible Publishing”), the group of (mostly) European state funders and...

‘An Initial Scholarly AI Taxonomy’

Adam Hyde, John Chodacki, and Paul Shanon, writing on FORCE11’s Upstream on seven key roles that “AI” could play in a scholarly publishing workflow: Extract: Identify and isolate specific entities or data points within the content. Validate: Verify the accuracy and...

‘The Tiny, Grammar-Bound Island’

My colleague Sue Curry Jansen and I, writing for The Hedgehog Review draft the neglected philosopher Susanne Langer as AI critic: Our modest objective here is to add a historical dimension to the critical toolkit by highlighting the work of a profoundly...

protocols.io has been bepressed

Announced in July, Springer Nature’s acquisition of protocols.io didn’t attract much attention: protocols.io will form part of Springer Nature’s expanding Solutions business which is committed to providing researchers, and their institutions, with a comprehensive...

Diamond Open Access Fund

Per Pippin, writing in LSE Impact on a Diamond Open Access Fund: Read-and-Publish deals are likely to be short lived; they were, after all, supposed to be ‘transitional deals’. The public money that has so far been spent on these deals could be better invested in this...

The Scholarly Fingeprinting industry

Note: This essay was recently published in Amerikastudien/American Studies, as part of a Forum on Digitization, Digital Humanities, and American Studies. The essay carries a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Elsevier, Taylor & Francis, Springer Nature, Wiley, and SAGE:...

MIT’s New Full-Book PDF Download Button

Speaking of the MIT Press, sometime in mid-April the press’s OA books began including a full-book, single-button download.1 Finally! As I and others have complained, the chapter-by-chapter download mode used by JSTOR, Project MUSE, and a number of OA publishers (MIT...

‘The Corporate Capture of Open-Access Publishing’

An excellent Chronicle piece [paywalled, alas] from Sarah Kember (Goldsmiths Press) and Amy Brand (the MIT Press), on the slate of well-intentioned OA policies from the U.S., Europe, and Britain: As the heads of progressive university presses on two sides of the North...