The Scholarly Fingeprinting industry

Note: This essay was recently published in Amerikastudien/American Studies, as part of a Forum on Digitization, Digital Humanities, and American Studies. The essay carries a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Elsevier, Taylor & Francis, Springer Nature, Wiley, and SAGE:...

MIT’s New Full-Book PDF Download Button

Speaking of the MIT Press, sometime in mid-April the press’s OA books began including a full-book, single-button download.1 Finally! As I and others have complained, the chapter-by-chapter download mode used by JSTOR, Project MUSE, and a number of OA publishers (MIT...

‘The Corporate Capture of Open-Access Publishing’

An excellent Chronicle piece [paywalled, alas] from Sarah Kember (Goldsmiths Press) and Amy Brand (the MIT Press), on the slate of well-intentioned OA policies from the U.S., Europe, and Britain: As the heads of progressive university presses on two sides of the North...

A Non-Update on the Organization Formerly Known as edX

Goldie Blumenstyk, [writing for *The Chronicle*](https://www.chronicle.com/newsletter/the-edge/2022-07-27) [paywalled] on her conversation with Cathie Smith, interim head of the nonprofit slated to inherit $800 million from the...

Surveillance Publishing, LLM Edition

From the press release announcing Clarivate’s partnership with AI21 Labs (“a pioneer in generative artificial intelligence”): The collaboration will integrate large language models into solutions from Clarivate, to enable intuitive academic conversational search and...

‘Simmons may cut some liberal arts departments’

Simmons University, a Boston women’s college, is cutting literature, philosophy, and sociology, among other majors—according to Inside Higher Ed. Enrollment is way down, but another challenge is the institution’s for-profit online-ed “partner”: President Lynn Perry...

‘Perspectives from Publishing’s Top Table – Steven Inchcoombe’

Steven Inchcoombe, “Chief Publishing Officer” at Springer Nature, in a January Scholarly Kitchen interview, asked what publishing innovation he’s most proud of: For me, I look at the work we have been doing using AI to enable summarizations (for different levels of...

2023: The Year of Nonprofit, Diamond OA

From the Open Access Week announcement: “Community over Commercialization” is the theme for this year’s International Open Access Week (October 23-29). This theme encourages a candid conversation about which approaches to open scholarship prioritize the best interests...

‘Performing Openness in Academic publishing’

Alex McLean, writing for on his blog about the treasure hunt required to find OA copies of his new book, despite a $15,000 subvention to MIT Press: Although all copies of the book are openly licensed into the creative commons, some are nonetheless paywalled. Indeed,...

‘A free toolkit to foster open access agreements’

Alicia Wise and Lorraine Estelle, writing in Insights: The realization of a transformative deal can be a complex and time-consuming process. Success is not only determined based on the results of the negotiation process, but also in the execution of the contract. To...

‘Public access is not equal access ‘

A good statement from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (publisher of Science): Gold OA journals, for which authors pay publication charges, work for senior scientists who are well-funded, tenured, and overwhelmingly male and white, but not so...

‘Introducing Nature Research Intelligence solutions’

More surveillance publishing from Springer Nature: Demonstrating research impact and setting a comprehensive strategy are critical tasks for any research organisation, but gathering trustworthy insights can be difficult and time-consuming. To support organisations in...